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Prosecco

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Definition: Prosecco, Italy's famed sparkling wine, and the name of the white grape that is used to produce the bubbly itself, hails from the Veneto region, in the northeast of the Italian boot and it's typically a fantastic value wine find - as versatile as it is economical. The dominant Prosecco producing towns are Valdobbiadene and Conegliano - buyer tip: look for these towns on the bottle label. Give up $10 and you will likely grab a Prosecco that offers delicate fruit and enticing aromatics, lots of bubbles (spumante) or lightly-bubbled (frizzante) and usually lies on the dry to off-dry side of the style spectrum. Give up $15-20 and you'll turn the whole Prosecco experience into overdrive - with more fruit vigor, more balance and loads of high-intensity aromatics. On the palate you can expect Prosecco to deliver ripe assorted apple, pear, some citrus and often a dash of nutty almond flavoring.

Prosecco is made using the Charmat method, making these wines a first rate wine to drink young and fresh. In general, Prosecco yields lower alcohol levels than many of its still wine counterparts and is best consumed within 2 years of release. Prosecco has another claim to fame, as Venice's popular Bellini cocktail is traditionally made with Prosecco and peach puree. If you are looking for a food-friendly, guest-friendly, easy-going, value-conscious, festive, sparkling white wine find - you will be hard pressed to do better than Italy's popular Prosecco! Serve well-chilled.

Food Pairing Options:

Give Prosecco a go with Prosciutto, stuffed mushrooms, creamy sauces, almonds, seafood, fried fare, spicy Asian entrees and even potato chips or buttered popcorn. This is a very forgiving, food-friendly sparkling wine option.

Prosecco Producers to try:

Silvano Follador

Zonin

Nino Franco

Zardetto

Mionetto

Pronunciation: Pro-se-koh
Also Known As: Italy's sparkling white wine
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